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CARPENTRY WINS ECO-CHALLENGE
CARPENTRY SOPHOMORES WIN ECO-CHALLENGE, $2,000 FOR SCHOOL
Posted on 06/25/2018
CARPENTRY SOPHOMORES WIN  ECO-CHALLENGE, $2,000 FOR SCHOOL

From left are judge Dan Peruzzi of Margulies Perruzzi Architects, Nashoba Tech sophomore Tyler Alden (Chelmsford) holding the trophy, sophomore Luke Boucher (Pepperell, Nashoba Tech Carpentry instructor Jonathan Pryor, mentor Ryan Eisenhauer of DPS Engineering, sophomore Jonathan Suero (Pepperell) and mentor Mike Bogdan of Fort Point Project Management.

Carpentry students in front of bunk beds built for ECO Challenge
Standing in front of the bunk bed designed and built by Nashoba Tech Carpentry students are front row, from left, Nashoba Tech Carpentry instructor Jonathan Pryor, and sophomores Jonathan Suero and Luke Boucher of Pepperell; and, back row, from left, mentor Ryan Eisenhauer of DPS Engineering, sophomore Tyler Alden (Chelmsford), judges Shaun Lover of Columbia Construction Brandon Needleman of Avison Young, Dan Peruzzi of Margulies Perruzzi Architects and Stephen Bertolami of Liberty Mutual Insurance, and mentor Mike Bogdan of Fort Point Project Management.

When it came time for three sophomores in the Carpentry program at Nashoba Tech to decide what to build for the eighth annual Eco-Carpentry Challenge, it turned out to be a no-brainer.

Carpentry instructor Jonathan Pryor had heard from the staff at Nashoba Tech’s Early Learning Center about a family of Syrian refugees living in Lowell and how one of the children didn’t have a bed to sleep in.

When he told his students, they decided to build a bunk bed for the family, complete with a basketball net, a slide, and a desk.

That bunk bed, made with recycled materials, won the Large Shop division in eighth annual Eco-Carpentry Challenge, earning $2,000 for Nashoba Tech’s Carpentry program.

“We kind of blew away the competition,” Pryor said.

The Furniture Trust started the Eco-Carpentry Challenge as a way to promote resourcefulness and recycling at the high-school level. The challenge tasks students in carpentry classes across Massachusetts to take used office furniture, provided by the trust, and refashion it into a new product, using woodworking and metal tools, hardware, sandpaper, paint and other materials. The used furniture can be cut, planed and drilled to the particular project’s specifications. There are no requirements or themes — the contest encourages teams of up-and-coming carpenters to be unrestrictedly creative.

Pryor decided to enter the contest for the first time to give his sophomores a project to work on. He and the students — Luke Boucher and Jonathan Suero of Pepperell and Tyler Alden of Chelmsford — were at District Hall in Boston, where The Furniture Trust reviewed all of the submitted projects and chose the winners.

Pryor said when the Early Childhood Center reached out to Carpentry about the Syrian family, “I thought we had the perfect match for our project.

The projects were judged on presentation, design, and viability.

“The judges were just so impressed with the kids’ knowledge and how they presented themselves,” Pryor said.

The students said knowing that their finished project would help somebody in need gave them extra initiative to build a solid bunk bed.

“I think it’s really cool that we had an opportunity to help somebody,” Alden said. “It was a good experience.”